Those looking for a free YouTube channel downloader that will allow them to get access to all of their favorite videos and channels directly on their own device will most definitely want to see these top options. Each of these five methods will provide you with a way to get the most out of the platform and also to make sure you never run out of things to watch. All you have to do is figure out which method works the best and just how it goes, which we’ll go over right here.
Since you're probably going to be paying for a backup service for years, cost is an important factor to consider. All the services rounded up here are subscription-based, but they partition their features and fees differently, so it's worth comparing plans closely before committing to one. Most construct pricing tiers based on the amount of cloud storage included, however, or by the number of devices you can use with an account. A few services offer permanent free accounts, but those plans impose paltry storage limits or restrict key features to the paid versions. Watch out for file-size upload limits as well.
Have something to say about one of the contenders? Want to make the case for your personal favorite, even if it wasn't included in the list? Remember, the top five are based on your most popular nominations from the call for contenders thread from earlier in the week. Don't just complain about the top five, let us know what your preferred alternative is—and make your case for it—in the discussions below.
Backblaze earned praise from many of you for being easy to set up, even for non-technical people. It's built for people who want to get their data backed up, without being forced to search for error codes and cryptic status messages whenever something goes wrong. To that point, Backblaze backs up just about everything on your system. You get some control over what's backed up and what isn't, but the point is to be fast, easy, and hands-off, so everything on your system—documents, music, video, external drives you have plugged in, just about anything. Instead of telling what they do back up, Backblaze actually has a special page dedicated to what they don't back up instead. Backblaze offers unlimited storage for your backed up data, and while by default it only backs up files smaller than 4GB, you can bump that up if you need to. Like other online backup services, it runs in the background, backing up your data all the time (or when you schedule it to, if you prefer), and your data is encrypted so only you have access to it. It supports Windows and OS X, and is smart enough to de-dupe data, do incremental backups, and keep backup processes low on system resources. You can read more about Backblaze's features here.

Carbonite's lowest tier plan, Safe Basic, runs $6.00 /month ($71.99 /year). There are two higher tiers available as well, called Safe Plus and Safe Prime, and run $9.34 /month ($111.99 /year) and $12.50 /month ($149.99 /year), respectively. Each tier is a bit cheaper if two or three years is paid upfront. Plus, they each have a few extras over the base service like external hard drive and mirror image support. 

If you’re in a place where you don’t really have internet, but you don’t want to use up the data that’s still available on your mobile device you can still get access to the information that you want. Downloading and watching videos can eat away a lot of data from your phone plan or it could take up a whole lot of bandwidth that you really don’t want to be using. Instead, you could have the video already downloaded and ready to play without you having to continue using up the data.
Carbonite's lowest tier plan, Safe Basic, runs $6.00 /month ($71.99 /year). There are two higher tiers available as well, called Safe Plus and Safe Prime, and run $9.34 /month ($111.99 /year) and $12.50 /month ($149.99 /year), respectively. Each tier is a bit cheaper if two or three years is paid upfront. Plus, they each have a few extras over the base service like external hard drive and mirror image support.
I'm using YouTube offline feature on my Android device, so that I can playback the offline videos within the YouTube app even there is no internet connection. When I searched for any of the video files, I can't find them on device/SD card memory. Are they encrypting the file so that it can be played only with YouTube app? Does anyone know the specific folder for offline video data? 

On YouTube we can find millions of creators who make channels with content of any genres: comedy, music, news, science fiction etc. Nowadays YouTube channel is equal to TV channel in our life. On the other hand, sometimes we want to watch our favorite video offline: in subway or airplane with our iPad or on HD TV. Many programs or websites offer to download video from YouTube, but 4K Video Downloader can download whole YouTube channels in one click! Learn how to do it in the next step-by-step guide.
If you’re looking to download a whole YouTube channel at one time, this is definitely one way that you can do it. WinX YouTube Downloader can download over 1000 URLs. Even more, it has support for different YouTube playlists and channels and even gives you the ability to record your own live videos, so this is one platform that can definitely achieve a whole lot more than you might have thought. On top of that, it doesn’t give you any kind of ads (because who wants to watch those?) and it lets you download from just about any kind of platform and into just about any kind of file.
No honorable mentions this week, as the nominations dropped off pretty sharply from these five. Some of you pointed to your own kind of franken-backup solution that made use of traditional cloud storage services like Dropbox and Google Drive in addition with desktop utilities and clients that can automatically copy whatever you want from your computer to specified files and folders in those services, which is a great option if you want the absolute ultimate in control. 
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